Small space gardening

I have the world’s smallest yard, and am always looking for ways to grow more veggies using every square inch. Here’s a great way to grow vining vegetables or flowers using a privacy fence, wire, string and some screw eyes.

Being a garage sale addict has its advantages. Last year I bought these nifty thing-a-majigs thinking they’d come in handy some day. And they certainly did! I’m not exactly sure what they were designed for–something to do with tv cables or some such thing. By the packaging, they appear to be from an era long before the invention of the television, but I’m sure if you look around at the hardware store you can find something similar. For five packages at 25 cents a piece, I paid a whopping $1.25 for the bunch. Not bad. I like these because they’re 7 1/2″ long, and will keep my vines away from my fence so they have good air circulation. We gardeners know that good air circulation means fewer diseases.

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Also purchased at garage sales, is my stash of wires and strings that I can use for my fence “trellis”. My personal favorite is fishing line. I always pick up fishing line at garage sales, and I always run out of it. Oddly enough, I don’t fish, but I use it like most people use duck tape. For this project, I decided to use wire for the horizontal lines, and fishing line for the vertical ones.

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

I made my trellis for green beans, because you can’t have a garden without green beans. You just can’t. Beans come in bush and pole varieties, so be sure to read the package to make sure you get pole beans if that’s your veggie of choice for your trellis. You’ll be highly disappointed if you purchase bush beans because they will show no interest whatsoever in your trellis, and they’ll just hang out happily on the ground.

I planted my beans on the north side of my fence, and was concerned about whether or not they would grow since the fence will shade them all morning. So I actually planted my beans, and made sure they looked like they were going to grow before I went to the trouble of making a trellis. A benefit, I discovered, in planting on the north side of a fence is that the shade helps keep the soil moist longer. Here are my little babies.

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

On the left in the photo below is bok choy which was temporarily sharing the space with my green beans. It’s a cool-weather crop here in zone 5, and was harvested throughout the spring and early summer, and then the green beans got the space all to themselves.

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

And this little guy is searching for his trellis!

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Once I was confident that beans would grow in this location, I decided how I wanted to space my screws to make a top row, a middle row and a bottom row. Then, I found a drill bit that was a tad smaller than my screws so I could pre-drill all my holes.

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

I made sure I placed the screw eyes so they would go through the 1 x 6 fence board as well as the 2 x 4 brace. I placed them about two feet apart.

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

They’re difficult to see, but this picture shows all my screw eyes installed. They’re easier to screw into the fence if you stick a screwdriver into the circle once you get them started. Then you just crank that screwdriver like nobody’s business, and you’re done in no time.

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Then it was time to install the horizontal wires through the screw eyes. This process would’ve been much faster if I had just woven my wire into one screw and out into the next one. But I wanted to be sure that if I had a wire malfunction, I wouldn’t lose the whole trellis. So I tied my wire to each screw eye individually, cut it, and started a new wire in between each screw eye. This way, if my wire were to break, I would only have to replace one small section.

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Then I checked my green bean package to find out what the spacing should be between plants so I would know how far apart to put my vertical fishing lines. I spaced mine about 6 to 8 inches apart. I would recommend not putting them any closer together than six inches because you want good air flow, you don’t want a tangled mess and you’ll have an easier time seeing the beans when it’s time to pick them.

I tied my fishing line to the top wire, looped it around the middle wire, and then tied it to the bottom wire. I must admit, while I was tying knot after endless knot, I was thinking there were many activities I’d have found more enjoyable, but we reap what we sow, right? And I was wanting to reap lots of green beans so I sucked it up buttercup, and “sowed” a bazillion knots. Finally, my trellis was ready for plants. I had more plants than wires in the beginning, but thinned them out so that each vine matched up with a string.

 photo IMG_3459.jpg

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Some plants latched on and wrapped around on their own.

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Some plants needed some loving guidance.

 How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

As the vines started to reach the fishing lines, I had to keep an eye on them so that each plant twined around the string that was meant for it to climb. Once they grabbed on, I didn’t have to watch them quite so closely.

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

The vines even grew through and over my fence, and I was picking green beans from both sides! Next year, I’ll know that once the vines reach the top of the fence, I need to flip them over to the other side. Some didn’t make it over, resulting in some tangles which makes it more difficult to see the green beans hiding in the mess. Here’s the back side of my fence which faces my side yard.

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

I had a bumper crop of green beans this year, and gave away several bags of beans to my neighbors. And most of the green beans came from a row that was only 10 feet long. It worked out great because the area really was too narrow and shady to grow much of anything else.

Here’s a picture of an A-frame trellis I made a couple of years ago that I also grew green beans on. I love this one too, but the fence trellis is easier to harvest from. The trellis pictured below is a great alternative if you don’t have a fence. Refer to my post “How to Build a Simple Trellis for Your Veggies and Flowers” for instructions showing how to build one for your garden.

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

How to Grow Veggies on a Privacy Fence / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Summer is now coming to a close (sigh), and I’m happy to report that the wires and strings held up very well–not a single break in the wires or the fishing lines. And as is the case with most of my projects, I wish I would have done this sooner!

If you have an interest in home decorating, organization and spruce ups for your home on a budget, please feel free to check my other blog at HomeStagingBloomingtonIl. You can find additional before and after pictures on my website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com.

This blog was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and a Journeyman Painter in the Bloomington/Normal, IL area. You can view her portfolios at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com for more before and after photos.

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