Small space gardening

This isn’t a post about gardening exactly, but I thought this would be useful information for anyone who uses a garden hose, and runs into the same frustrating problem I just had.

I went to remove the spray nozzle from my garden hose so I could attach a fertilizer sprayer, and I couldn’t unscrew the nozzle from the hose. The nozzle felt like it had been super-glued on! I put on my rubber dishwashing gloves for a better grip, which usually gets me out of a jam. No luck. I then tried my no-fail WD-40, pliers, vice grips, a pipe wrench, and any other tool I had that would grip, including my son, Brandon. Still no luck. I sprayed it again with WD-40, let it set for a day, and tried again. It wasn’t budging. The only thing I accomplished was trashing out the nozzle trying to twist it off.

I gave up on that hose, and tried to use a different one. Low and behold, that nozzle was also stuck to the hose. I was starting to feel like I was in the Twilight Zone. I did manage to get the second one off after a lot of huffing and puffing (and a swear word or two). I always try to have an “attitude of gratitude” during times like these, and I would like to state for the record that I told myself to be grateful that I have a hose in the first place, that I have water available that runs through the hose, and finally, that this crazy weld-like seal keeps my hose from leaking. (I didn’t feel one ioda better after that positive thought, but thought I’d share anyway.)

I tell my sad story to my work buddy, “Squeak” (surprise, not his birth name), and find out that you should never leave your nozzle on your hose all winter. He’s had the same experience. Both of my hoses were stored in my garage out of the weather, but it doesn’t matter. I’m not sure of the scientific reason for this irritating phenomenon, but one thing I am sure of, is that I’m pretty bummed, because I just bought my hose last summer.

So I look to Squeak for some words of wisdom. He tells me when he couldn’t remove his nozzle, he just cut it right off the hose. So now I’m thinking to myself, “That’s pretty redneck to have a hose with no end piece on it. What kind of solution is that?!” But then he tells me that you can buy replacement threaded ends for hoses, and now I have a new lease on life knowing I can save my stubborn little hose. Who knew.

So I go to Wally World, and find what I need. The piece is called a Hose Mender, and only cost $2.88. For the end of the hose that accommodates a nozzle, I need the “Male” Hose Mender. If you understand the birds and the bees, you’ll know what I mean by that. If you don’t, I can’t explain all that here because this is a G-rated blog, and because your parents should have taught you about that already. If you happen to need the piece that attaches to your spigot, you’ll need a “Female” Hose Mender. Here’s a picture.

How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

First I cut off the little do-jiggy that labels the part.

 How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Next, I perform a nozzlectomy with my utility knife. (I should have been a surgeon.)

 How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

 How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Now I loosen both screws in order to spread this piece apart so that it fits over the hose.

 How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Here’s what it looks like after the screws have been loosened.

 How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasisg

I slip it over the hose like so.

 How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Now I push in the threaded piece, which is graduated to accommodate different sized hoses.

 How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

I cut the hose a little cleaner because I’m somewhat OCD, slide the piece with the screws up so it fits against the threaded piece, and then tighten the screws. It’s best to tighten one screw a half turn, then the other screw a half turn, etc…instead of tightening one side all the way and then the other. Fixed! Although I did have to spring for a new nozzle (my old one was near death anyway), this was waaaay cheaper than buying a new hose, and it’s one less piece of trash in the landfill too!

How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

Now I can keep my garden watered and beautiful! For photos of my tiny city garden, refer to my post, “Simply My Backyard“.

How to Remove a Nozzle That's Stuck to a Garden Hose / MyUrbanGardenOasis

The moral of the story is don’t leave your nozzle on your hose all winter. But if you forget, or run over the end of your hose with the car and bend it to smithereens, now you know just what to do. (Thanks, Squeak!)

This blog was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and a Journeyman Painter servicing the Bloomington/Normal, IL area. You can view her portfolios at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com for more before and after photos.

If you have an interest in home decorating, organization, and home spruce ups on a budget, please feel free to check her other blog at HomeStagingBloomingtonIl. You can find additional before and after pictures on her website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com.

Advertisements

Comments on: "How to Remove a Nozzle That’s Stuck to a Garden Hose" (16)

  1. Brilliant!!!! I spent all summer trying with no luck to get a broken nozzle off a hose I inherited when I bought my house. I’m just hoping the hose never springs a leak, because the end attached to the nozzle on the house is stuck, too! Thank you!

    Like

    • Oh no!! I hope you never spring a leak either!! I was glad this post helped you. I was thrilled to find the adapters–and they work! This post has proven to be one of the most hit on of all the posts on my blog, so it must be a common problem. I’ve been a homeowner (and a hose-owner) for 35 years and never had the nasty experience until this year, which leads me to believe some of the hose manufacturers out there must be using a cheaper, non-compatible metal. The bad news is, the hose and nozzle can spontaneously “weld” in a few weeks. This year I may loosen my nozzle every so often to save myself a giant headache. Thank you for your comment!

      Like

  2. I had a lot of fun reading this. Lmao lol lol pretty funny but helpful. Hahahaha….

    Like

  3. Can I just say I love you! I nearly burst into tears yesterday feeling like I’m getting too old to manage these things. But you showed me the way to the fix. I don’t have to hire a person stronger than me to come fix it. I’m heading to the hardware store right now! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!! Oh, and your style and attitude….pitch perfect.

    Like

    • And can I say thank you and you almost made me burst into tears with your kind words! Kindness from a stranger…can’t beat it. We females have to be resourceful in our old age. I’ve had to fend for myself for many years, so I’ve learned a lot about how to handle things on my own. And I work with all men, so sometimes they have awesome suggestions to help me out. It makes me happy that you didn’t have to hire someone to help you. Carry on!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you for this helpful info. I just fixed my hose! Yay! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. SHARON HUTCHISON said:

    I would like to add to previous comments with my personal and sincere THANK YOU! I, too, thought I’d gotten too old and feeble to manage nozzle removal. To find out that it’s not me but the nozzle is amazing (and far too rare, in my opinion). Your post is amazing in not only explaining that every trick and tool won’t work, but in explaining how to save the hose! I live in a Wally free area, so I’m off to find out what Amazon can do for me. Tonight when I give thanks, I’m adding you and this blog post right after hot running water. That went on the list last summer after an unfortunate period of no hot water in the kitchen. You’re a blessing!

    Like

    • Thank you for your kind words! They mean a lot to me…sincerely. I guess maybe I should be adding more of these simple tricks and tips to my blogs that I find useful, but don’t really think about sharing. Sometimes I just assume everyone already knows about these quick fixes. The hose repair in particular, however, I’d not heard of, and assumed I probably wasn’t the only poor soul out there who hadn’t.

      In addition, any hardware store or box store like Lowe’s, Menard’s or Home Depot should carry Hose Menders, as well as Walmart.

      Glad I could help, and happy watering!

      Like

  6. Shelagh T. Sinclair said:

    I have also started to have this problem over the last 2-4 yrs and strongly suspect that there has been a change in the alloys used in the nozzle hose receivers (female end~Yeah I am a FACOG). First I blamed it on leaving the nozzles on over the winter but couldn’t remove them at the end of the summer. Then tried to loosen them half way through the summer; even with teflon tape …. no dice. Now I’m going to attach a short length of hose with male and female ends to each nozzle so I can remove them to use spray feeders and sprinklers.

    Like

  7. It worked!!! I had a sprinkler that had busted (yup, left it on the hose over the winter… never again!) and could *not* get it off the hose! One quick trip to Menard’s (Michigan’s version of Home Depot or Lowes), $3.17 including tax, and I was in business!! Thank you!!

    Like

  8. do you think this will work on one of those flexible hoses?

    Like

    • I wish I could answer that question, but I really couldn’t say. You could always try it and return the part if it doesn’t work. The only thing is, you’d be out your hose. Sorry I can’t help! 😦

      Like

Did you enjoy this post? Any questions?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: